Celebration Marks End of Open Defecation in Three Villages in Mopti Region, Mali

The WASHplus Project, funded by the United States Government via USAID, triggers change in sanitation practices through the community-led total sanitation (CLTS) approach with a “plus” component that includes an emphasis on hand washing with soap after using the toilet. In Mali the plus component also signifies supply-side interventions to develop and promote low-cost latrine models appropriate to the unique environmental conditions in each district coupled with training community-based masons to build robust latrines using local materials. To complement the CLTS-driven approach in rural areas, WASHplus is beginning a sanitation marketing activity to engage materials suppliers and local entrepreneurs to market a line of aspirational sanitation products in Mopti’s urban areas. The WASHplus project is led by FHI 360 globally. In Mali, WASHplus activities are implemented through CARE International and two Malian NGOs, YAG-TU and Sahel Eco.

Recently the WASHplus Project in Mali organized public ceremonies to certify Open Defecation Free (ODF) status of three villages in the Mopti Region. These villages, each of which are located in priority areas for USAID’s Feed the Future and Global Health initiatives, were recognized as being the first in their municipality to reach ODF status.

From September 25th to 27th 2014, the USAID/Mali Director Gary Juste, accompanied by the Governor of Mopti Region, and the National Director of Sanitation led certification ceremonies in three villages in the presence of national and regional authorities, the CARE Mali Country Director, as well as local officials and residents from the villages. All three villages reached or exceeded the targeted criteria for certifications. The village of Allaye-Daga built 31 latrines against a target of 28. Wendeguele achieved 150% of their latrine target, and Kanikombole built 28 latrines against a target of 10. Local community leaders, women and youth all recognized the importance of the project and the impact safe disposal of human feces with have on the health and nutritional status of the populations, especially children under five. In the village of Allaye Daga, there was not a single latrine before the project, but now everybody uses latrines and the community has adopted social conventions to deal with noncompliance with ODF standards.

Photos from the certification ceremonies are posted below. These photos and description of the certification ceremonies were originally published on the USAID website here: http://www.usaid.gov/news-information/photo-gallery/certification-end-open-air-defecation-ceremony and here: http://www.usaid.gov/mali/news/usaid-promotes-hygiene-and-sanitation-through-innovative-approach

The Mayor of Sio hands out certificate to the village chief
The Mayor of Sio handing certificate over to the chief of the village of Wendeguele. Photo credit: USAID Mali.
Youth in Kanikombole vow to abide by hygiene and sanitation standards
Youth in Kanikombole vow to abide by hygiene and sanitation standards. Photo credit: USAID Mali.
USAID WASH Adviser engages communities on WASH
USAID WASH Adviser engages communities on WASH. Photo credit: USAID Mali.
Girls stood up against open-air defecation
Community-Led Total Sanitation benefits girls in Kanikombole. Photo credit: USAID Mali.
Communities in KaniKombole recognize USAID through a special award handed out to USAID WASH Advisor (Right)
Communities in KaniKombole recognize USAID through a special award handed out to USAID/Mali WASH Advisor (Right). Photo credit: USAID Mali.
USAID/Mali Director and Mopti Governor pose after unveiling the certification plaque. Photo credit: USAID Mali.
USAID Director (right), WASH Adviser (midlle), and Health Office Director
USAID/Mali Director (right), WASH Adviser (middle), and Health Office Director. Photo credit: USAID Mali.
There is the toilet!! Mopti Governor and USAID Director pointing to it
There is the toilet!! Mopti Governor and USAID/Mali Director pointing to it. Photo credit: USAID Mali.
USAID Director and Mopti Governor unveil certification sign board in Wendeguele
USAID/Mali Director and the Governor of Mopti unveil the certification sign board in Wendeguele. Photo credit: USAID Mali.
Mopti Governor and USAID Director visit a latrin under construction
Certification of End-of-open air defecation ceremony: Mopti Governor and USAID/Mali Director visit a latrine under construction. Photo Cresit: USAID Mali
USAID Director hand out certification for Allaye-Daga to Mopti Governor
USAID/Mali Director hand out certification for Allaye-Daga to Mopti Governor. Photo credit: USAID Mali.
USAID Director admires certification plaque for Allaye-Daga
USAID/Mali Director admires certification plaque for Allaye-Daga. Photo credit: USAID Mali.
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WASHplus Project in Kenya Shares Experiences in Transitioning Workshop

By George Nyairo Obanyi, FHI 360

george_obanyi1About the Author: George Nyairo Obanyi is the Information Officer for FHI 360/Kenya based in Nairobi. George provides communications support to the country office and field programs.

The USAID-funded WASHplus project ended its four years in Kenya with an experience-sharing workshop for key stakeholders held in Nairobi on September 25th 2014.

Representatives from USAID, government, other partners and community members converged for the one-day event during which the project showcased its achievements through plenary presentations, video shows and a photo gallery.

Kenya is one of seven countries where the WASHplus project works with partners to create supportive environments for healthy households and communities by creating and delivering interventions that lead to improvements in water supply, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) and household air pollution.

In Kenya, the project partnered with the Ministry of Health to strengthen the capacity in public and private sectors as well as communities to implement sustainable WASH interventions.

WASHplus introduced and successfully promoted the small doable action (SDAs) concept, which has been accepted by government and other WASH actors to encourage hand washing, use of latrines, menstrual hygiene management and water treatment and safe storage.

Another key WASHplus achievement was its pioneering role in promoting inclusive sanitation approaches under an innovative, value-added community-led total sanitation (CLTSplus) approach to promote open defecation free (ODF) communties, which was successfully piloted in two rural counties and one urban site.

In its role as a national mechanism, the project helped to develop policies and training guides including a training curriculum for WASH-HIV integration and a module for training community volunteers.

Other notable achievements include:

  • Over 650 trainers from government and 8,000 CHWs trained on WASH-HIV integration and inclusive sanitation through Community Strategy
  • Improving access to sanitary pads for girls and women in communities
  • Community volunteers and leaders trained to help make supportive devices for individuals with disabilities

Interventions initiated and supported by WASHplus have now been transitioned to the government and other USAID-supported health projects.

Kenya’s deputy Chief Public Health Officer Dr John Kimani addresses the WASHplus Kenya end-of-project experience-sharing workshop held in Nairobi on September 25th 2014. Photo: Elisha Ratem
Kenya’s deputy Chief Public Health Officer Dr John Kimani addresses the WASHplus Kenya end-of-project experience-sharing workshop held in Nairobi on September 25th 2014. Photo: Elisha Ratem

Speaking at the experience-sharing workshop, the Deputy Director for Public Health at Kenya’s Ministry of Health, Dr. John Kariuki, said the WASHplus program had made strategic contributions to improving WASH interventions in the country.

“County legislators should now invest money to continue the process,” he said. “As we have worked with WASHplus, we will as a Ministry continue to give policy direction and guidelines to the counties.”

Said Dr. Kariuki: “The biggest lesson is about equity and sanitation. We cannot talk about a county being ODF if the people who are disabled or the old people are not using latrines. They are Kenyans and have a right to sanitation.”

The official urged stakeholders to lobby county governments to allocate funds for WASH activities:  “It does not happen automatically. You must be proactive, not wait for thing to happen.”

Representatives of organizations that partnered with WASHplus also praised the project for helping to shape the WASH interventions. Charles Ngira of the NGO Plan International said: “We should be talking of inclusive CLTS, not just CLTS. This model will totally solve our sanitation problem.”

Dr. Kariuki called for integrated CLTS programs that promote practices such as hand washing, menstrual hygiene management, the work of traditional birth attendants and air pollution, among other aspects.

“Let’s use CLTS as a vehicle to ensure we improve the health of our people,” he said.

“Sanitation has improved but we need to address equity and inclusion,” said Dr. Mores Loopapit, deputy project director of the USAID-funded APHIAplus Imarisha. “There is need to consider health outcomes in studies on access to hygiene and sanitation.”

Simon Makori, associate director of APHIAplus Nuru ya Bonde, urged stakeholders to support community health volunteers because they play a critical role on promoting WASH practices.

“Community health workers should be engaged in income-generating activities for sustainability,” he said.

For more information about the project, visit the WASHplus Kenya page: http://www.washplus.org/countries/kenya

Pic6_Charles Odira

Pic-4_Makena presents

Pic6_Charles Odira