WASH-NTD Integration Program Model

More than 1 billion people worldwide suffer from one or more painful, debilitating tropical diseases that disproportionately impact poor and rural populations, cause severe sickness and disability, compromise mental and physical development, contribute to childhood malnutrition, reduce school enrollment, and hinder economic productivity. Three of these diseases are directly linked to water, sanitation, and hygiene practices.

WASHplus designed and implemented a model integrated WASH-NTD program that was tested as a small pilot effort in Burkina Faso from 2015–2016. The objectives in Burkina Faso were to:

1. Promote coordination within government among sectors related to WASH-NTD integration

2. Develop a comprehensive implementation activity in several villages in one district

3. Share experience and lessons learned with other partners who may be able to advance or further develop this activity

4. Provide a toolkit for Burkina Faso and global partners to use

This toolkit is the result of the WASHplus project in Burkina Faso and has the following components.

WASHplus Year Five Annual Report, October 2015

WASHplus Year 5 Annual Report.png

In its Year Five Annual Report, WASHplus has stories to tell, results to share, events to celebrate, and studies that add to the evidence base. WASHplus activities serve as the backdrop for many stories: the Zambian school girl who has access to privacy and menstrual supplies when she needs them, the Malian household that can now build an improved latrine on their rocky soil, the mother in Bangladesh who understands the importance of a feces-free environment, the Nepali home breathing cleaner air as it trials an improved cookstove. And perhaps more compelling than the individual stories are the results the project is beginning to record through endline data collection in Kenya and formative research on school enrollment and in Zambia. Providing water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) infrastructure to schools is having a notable impact on enrollment. Community-led total sanitation (CLTS) may be inoculating communities exposed to cholera. Numbers also tell the story of the project’s impact. Look for a snapshot of those figures throughout the report.

The conclusion of field activities in Uganda and Zambia this year provided opportunities to reflect, celebrate accomplishments through end-of-project (EOP) events, and share lessons learned. Several articles were published this year in peer-reviewed journals and others submitted on topics ranging from consumer preferences and willingness to pay for improved cookstoves to habit formation and costing of handwashing. WASHplus also played a key role in preparing the joint document on WASH and nutrition for publication and distribution.

WASHplus’s focus on integrating WASH into other development initiatives enabled the project to get in on the ground floor on subjects that are gaining traction at USAID and globally, such as WASH and nutrition, neglected tropical diseases, and MHM. This integration focus dovetailed nicely with the project’s mandate to serve a technical leadership role, and project staff had many opportunities this year to share its work and lessons from the field on a global stage, strategize with partners on important advocacy issues, inform policy, and develop guidance in multiple countries. Also toward that end, WASHplus launched its first two learning briefs on small doable actions and WASH and nutrition. This series details the variety of approaches WASHplus uses to improve WASH and household air pollution (HAP) across its portfolio of countries.

And finally, it’s been an exciting year for innovation with pilot projects underway in Ethiopia and Bangladesh focusing on sanitation marketing and sand envelopment. These two efforts will add to WASHplus’s body of knowledge on sanitation innovation and aligns closely with USAID’s global interest on the topic. WASHplus is also documenting its fecal sludge management work in Madagascar to tell the next chapter in that story.

9 AM EST, Feb 16 Webinar: WASHing Away Diseases, Two Hands at a Time

WASH NTDs webinar

On February 18 at 9:00 AM EST, please join the Global Public-Private Partnership for Handwashing and the USAID/WASHplus project for a webinar discussing why water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) matter to neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), and addressing the need for new approaches for multi-sector initiatives to promote equity, poverty alleviation, health, and well-being.

Register here today!

Featuring experts from WaterAid, Sightsavers, the FHI 360-led USAID/WASHplus project, and USAID, this webinar is an excellent opportunity for those working in both WASH and NTDs to learn about the global landscape of WASH/NTD strategy and glean practical insights from projects that are operating in this context.

This webinar will include brief presentations on:

  • The link between WASH and NTDs
  • How we can work together to achieve common goals through the World Health Organization’s Joint WASH-NTD strategy; and
  • Integration in practice.

About the panelists:

  • Renuka Bery, MPH, Senior Program Manager for the USAID/WASHplus project, has an extensive background in WASH integration.
  • Sophie Boisson, PhD, Technical Officer for Water, Sanitation, Hygiene and Health at the World Health Organization (invited).
  • Edouard Tianhoun, RN, MSc, WASH-NTD Coordinator for the USAID/WASHplus Burkina Faso pilot project, has been in involved in WASH programs in his native Burkina Faso since 2011.
  • Yael Velleman, MSc, Senior Policy Analyst on Health and Sanitation, leads WaterAid’s strategy, advocacy, and research agenda on health.
  • Merri Weinger, MPH, Senior Environmental Health Advisor at USAID’s Bureau for Global Health, has over 30 years of experience in health programs at USAID, WHO, and PAHO.
  • Geordie Woods, MPH, Technical Adviser-NTDs at Sightsavers, specializes in health behavior and strategic communication with a technical focus that includes NTDs and WASH.

Following the presentations there will be a Question & Answer session.

Register now!

WASHplus Presents Poster at ASTMH 2015

Renu at ASTMH 2015

@wasplusinfo’s Renu Bery presents a poster on integrating into at 2015 ASTMH Meeting!

In October 2015, WASHplus presented a poster at the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Annual Meeting on the current situation, intervention design, behavior change plan, and expected results of its Burkina Faso WASH and neglected tropical disease (NTD) pilot activity, called “How Can Integrating Sanitation and Hygiene into an NTD Control Program Accelerate Reduction in NTDs?” View the poster here.

WASHplus Presents at 2015 #UNCWaterandHealth Conference

The WASHplus is in Chapel Hill this week (October 26-29, 2015), presenting at the UNC Water and Health Conference organized by the UNC Water Institute.  Conference presentations can be viewed on the WASHplus website. Here are presentation highlights, captured from conference attendees’ tweets!

UNC Orlando

UNC Renu

Julia at UNC

Controlling NTDs through WASH in Burkina Faso

wash ntd integration

WASHplus  is exploring WASH interventions that can be used to help eliminate and/or control trachoma, soil transmitted helminthes, and schistosomiasis. The activities are conceptualized in three phases: desk review; joint NTD/WASHplus assessments in two countries—Bangladesh and Burkina Faso; and pilot implementation in one country. The pilot WASH-NTD integration activity is being implemented in Gnagna Province, eastern Burkina Faso. Following an assessment visit, WASHplus hired a coordinator who is establishing relationships with the Ministry of Health’s neglected tropical disease division, UNICEF, other USAID partners and local organizations engaged in WASH and NTD activities. WASHplus will precede program implementation with a baseline study on WASH practices and NTD knowledge in intervention villages. WASHplus will also assist the government to facilitate a WASH-NTD integration working group at the national level and in the communes in which WASHplus will work. The community-based behavior change intervention will be carried out by a local organization and supported, if feasible, with a radio campaign. The materials developed by the project will be available for the government and other key partners to use in other areas of the country, when the WASHplus project closes in 2016.