WASHplus Year Five Annual Report, October 2015

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In its Year Five Annual Report, WASHplus has stories to tell, results to share, events to celebrate, and studies that add to the evidence base. WASHplus activities serve as the backdrop for many stories: the Zambian school girl who has access to privacy and menstrual supplies when she needs them, the Malian household that can now build an improved latrine on their rocky soil, the mother in Bangladesh who understands the importance of a feces-free environment, the Nepali home breathing cleaner air as it trials an improved cookstove. And perhaps more compelling than the individual stories are the results the project is beginning to record through endline data collection in Kenya and formative research on school enrollment and in Zambia. Providing water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) infrastructure to schools is having a notable impact on enrollment. Community-led total sanitation (CLTS) may be inoculating communities exposed to cholera. Numbers also tell the story of the project’s impact. Look for a snapshot of those figures throughout the report.

The conclusion of field activities in Uganda and Zambia this year provided opportunities to reflect, celebrate accomplishments through end-of-project (EOP) events, and share lessons learned. Several articles were published this year in peer-reviewed journals and others submitted on topics ranging from consumer preferences and willingness to pay for improved cookstoves to habit formation and costing of handwashing. WASHplus also played a key role in preparing the joint document on WASH and nutrition for publication and distribution.

WASHplus’s focus on integrating WASH into other development initiatives enabled the project to get in on the ground floor on subjects that are gaining traction at USAID and globally, such as WASH and nutrition, neglected tropical diseases, and MHM. This integration focus dovetailed nicely with the project’s mandate to serve a technical leadership role, and project staff had many opportunities this year to share its work and lessons from the field on a global stage, strategize with partners on important advocacy issues, inform policy, and develop guidance in multiple countries. Also toward that end, WASHplus launched its first two learning briefs on small doable actions and WASH and nutrition. This series details the variety of approaches WASHplus uses to improve WASH and household air pollution (HAP) across its portfolio of countries.

And finally, it’s been an exciting year for innovation with pilot projects underway in Ethiopia and Bangladesh focusing on sanitation marketing and sand envelopment. These two efforts will add to WASHplus’s body of knowledge on sanitation innovation and aligns closely with USAID’s global interest on the topic. WASHplus is also documenting its fecal sludge management work in Madagascar to tell the next chapter in that story.

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World Toilet Day = Systems Day = Nutrition Day

By Ron Clemmer, Strategy and Business Development Manager, WASH, FHI 360.

World Toilet Day is about more than toilets! It is about the whole system of the sanitation chain. This whole “system” of household latrines; school and health facility toilets; septage haulers; wastewater and septage treatment, reuse and disposal, has become more and more a focus of international development professionals. As with development practitioners in other sectors, we work in complex social systems that require organizational change, behavioral change, and personal change for transformative social change to result in sustainable impact. A systems lens helps us to see our roles in development programs to understand the impact that is needed in the big picture of the “system.”

FHI 360’s 2015 Challenge Conference Deepening Systemic Engagement addressed an important question for systems thinking: “How do we as practitioners and change agents unify systems theory and practice to bring forth healthy and inclusive human development?”

FHI 360 brought together speakers who are leaders in the area of systems thinking and also practitioners who are implementing a systems approach for international development for the Challenge Conference. The keynote speaker was Otto Scharmer from the MIT Sloan School of Management, who with Katrin Kaufer co-authored, Leading from the Emerging Future: From Ego-System to Eco-System Economies.

Being the pragmatic engineer that I am, some of the presentations that peaked my interest the most were from FHI 360 colleagues discussing the application of systems approaches in their development programs. A systems approach that FHI 360 staff has developed in conjunction with USAID is SCALE (System-wide Collaborative Action for Livelihoods and Environment). Ten years of learning through the implementation of the SCALE systems methodology to accelerate broad stakeholder engagement in sustained collaborative action to address a complex development issues has now resulted in FHI 360’s development of SCALE+.

If you want to explore more of Deepening Systemic Engagement, the Challenge Conference highlight videos and materials can be found here.

World Toilet Day is also about more than toilets because of the significant impact of good sanitation on maternal and child health, neglected tropical diseases, HIV/AIDS, education, and nutrition. World Toilet Day has a special linkage to nutrition this year, and 2015 World Toilet Day was chosen as the day that WHO/UNICEF/USAID are releasing the important publication Improving Nutrition Outcomes through Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: Practical Solutions for Policies and Programmes. My FHI 360 WASHplus colleagues managed the development of this publication in collaboration with the publishing agencies. And the integrated activities in different countries implemented by WASHplus and its partners are contributing practical knowledge and tools that will help guide WASH-nutrition integration in the future.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Ron Clemmer joined FHI 360 in May 2015 after working with World Vision as Senior Technical Advisor for WASH for six years. Ron is passionate about building sustainable water and sanitation services through the public and private sectors, hygiene behavior change that becomes habit, and integrated programming of WASH with nutrition, HIV, neglected tropical diseases, education, and women’s empowerment.

WASHplus Presents at USAID Global Infrastructure Conference 2014

In December 2014, the USAID/Washington E3 Bureau invited Jonathan Annis to present learning from his experiences supporting public-private partnerships in Madagascar on day two of USAID’s Global Infrastructure Conference. The session was well attended by a diverse mix of domestic and overseas USAID staff working on WASH, infrastructure, and environmental compliance.

View Jonathan presentation here: http://www.washplus.org/sites/default/files/annis-fsm3_conference2015.pdf